Posted in mindset

Good old cookbooks

When I turned vegetarian, a friend gifted me a copy of How to Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman.

I used it a fair amount, and nearly everything I made from it was delicious. Not all of it was easy, and most of it wasn’t quick, but it was tasty. Homemade pasta e fagioli? There’s no other way to eat it now.

Over time, I’ve more often cooked from recipes I found online. I love food blogs and have gotten about a bajillion recipes from them.

Just this past week, The Climbing Daddy was looking through another hardcover cookbook I have, Thug Kitchen. Another source of nearly-always amazing food. Not a book for those offended by salty language.

While I was going through folders on the computer, looking for a specific recipe that I haven’t made in ages (that I never did find; I’m more organized now), I saw a document: Bittman book favs.

I opened it up and saw recipes I still make regularly without the recipe (because I’ve done them enough) but also others that I’d forgotten about.

The Climbing Daddy picked out a couple from Thug Kitchen.

Between us, we planned all dinners for the week from those two cookbooks.

And they were all tasty.

So if you have a cookbook or two around the house somewhere, crack it open and see what you find. Not everything worth making is online.

Author:

My name is Heat! (It's short for Heather.) My last name is Polish and has a few Zs in it and it's really just easier this way.

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