Posted in education, know better do better, mindset

Keyboard skills

When I was in college, the phrase “keyboard skills” evoked many negative reactions from many of us.

Learning to play piano was, succinctly, not a good time.

But even at the college level, we weren’t handed a Beethoven piano sonata and asked to plunk it out by whatever means necessary.

This is what we’re doing to kids in schools. On the other kind of keyboard.

Technology is a big deal right now, and many people clamor for more and more technology.

Testing is also a big deal, and the majority of the Tests are computer-based.

But at no point are kids being taught how to type. Not in a slow, systematic way that actually yields students who can touch type.

Maybe they’ll be shown where their fingers go and it will be explained some. But kids in kindergarten are being asked to log in to computers, and the only way you can do that is to type in your user name and password.

(What they’re doing after that varies. Working with a mouse or a track pad seems appropriate maybe.)

We didn’t even have computers in school until I was in late elementary school. (Shakes fist at kids on lawn.) And yet we learned to use computers. People my age and older are not in short supply in the tech industry.

Children don’t need to be on computers from when they’re young to be able to learn them. Children do need to be taught to type if they’re going to be effective using keyboards. (I have so many thoughts about what we should and shouldn’t be doing in the lower elementary grades and younger, but that’s a series of rants for another day.)

I was talking to a friend who does IT work. He said that they have young programmers who hunt and peck. Pretty quickly, but still.

Delay computer use in schools. Teach keyboard skills.

Posted in Sunday photos

My photography journey 16Feb20

We went for a hike on a trail we don’t do often. We established ahead of time that it was for hiking and for photos. (Need to clarify that!) We had a goal and not a lot of daylight, so the way out was all hike (except when we stopped for the inevitable snack). Fun trail, perfect weather, a few nice pics.

This one looks to me like the plant is saying, “What are you talking about?!”

Me and dead plants…

Posted in education, meandering, mental health, mindset, parenting

Brains

“Every time you learn something, your brain changes.”

Whether you learn it correctly or not, whether you learn something big or small, something important or not important, something loving or hateful, it physically changes your brain.

I heard this somewhere a couple of months ago, and it stuck with me. (Happy to cite if you heard it, too, and know where it’s from!)

A solid reminder to filter, to some extent, what’s incoming.

Posted in Sunday photos

My photography journey 9Feb20

A few shots of The Kid using a beautiful sky as a backdrop. I would have liked to have more of his body in the photos, but houses were in the way, and we didn’t have a tall enough thing for him to stand on. (As it was, he was on a step stool and I was laying on the ground.)

 

 

Other photos I’ve taken this week as homework for the photography course I’m in didn’t turn out great. I mean, they’re fine but not terribly interesting to look at.

When I learn editing software, I’ll be able to make photos like the above with better sky color.

I have a few portrait shots that I’m going to experiment with. Will share if they turn out OK.

Posted in motivation, tips

If you want to use it, make it accessible

A common bit of eating advice is to make convenient the foods that you actually would like to be eating more of. Produce on the counter or in obvious places in the fridge. Junk food harder to get to, not noticeable as soon as you open the fridge or pantry door (if it’s in the house at all).

It’s true with more than food.

We have three ukuleles here at the house. They were tucked in their cases in a corner in the living room. At The Tall Daddy’s house, there was an electric piano in the office.

Occasionally, we’d pull out the ukes. Every now and then, he’d play the piano.

We just did some rearranging in the living room, and the ukuleles are hanging on the wall now. And we decided to bring over the electric piano.

So now, the instruments are all right in the main thoroughfare in the house. And you know what?

They’re getting played. Not necessarily daily, but substantially more than every now and then.

What do you want more of in your house? Can you make it more easily accessible? (And the flip side: can you make less accessible things you want less of?)