Posted in about me, mindset, parenting, storytelling, thoughtfulness

What would your micro robot do?

Sitting down to dinner the other night.

The Kid: Can I start a conversation?

me: Sure

[Note: I think it’s weird that he asked that, as there’s definitely not a “seen but not heard” rule ’round here. Also, because of that, I should have known something was up.]

TK: If you had a micro robot, what would it do?

[conversation ensues about what constitutes a micro robot—the answer is basically smaller than a typical adult human which is bigger than I would consider micro, but it’s not my question]

TK: I have an idea, but you go first.

me: OK. I want mine to clean the house. Wait. Can it do more than one thing? Can it clean the house and cook?

Climbing Daddy: You have yours do one and I’ll have mine do the other.

TK: It can do both.

me: Oh! But better than that, it can pull the grass and the weeds in the yard. Can it do all three things?

TK: Sure!

CD: Hmmm, so I don’t need mine to do any of those things? Let me think.

TK: I’ll tell you mine! It’s going to be very small, the size of a human cell. And … [insert long explanation about how his micro robot is going to capture and kill viruses inside people, and how it would first be for people in the hospital and high risk people but it could be for everyone]

And that’s how long it took for me to be embarrassed that my micro robot would take care of household chores.

Also, this is one way he is dealing with the pandemic, and it was obvious he had spent some time thinking about it prior to opening the conversation.

Also, if his robot is going to take care of massive health issues, I might as well let mine take care of the house. And assuming both are going to be widely available…

Also, I’m still feeling a little defensive. Can you tell?

Posted in about me, storytelling

Anecdotal silliness (and stupidity)

We didn’t have a printer.

We ordered a printer.

The description said it came without toner.

(That did not make me happy.)

We ordered toner.

We ordered paper.

The toner shipped.

The paper shipped.

Separately.

The printer was out of stock and was cancelled.

The paper arrived.

The toner arrived.

An email arrived, asking me how my experience was…

We ordered the printer from somewhere else.

The printer arrived.

I set the printer up.

The printer came with toner.

Also, just to make working at home more like working at work, I set up the printer in a room where there are no computers.

Posted in ebb & flow, meandering, storytelling

Words words words SO MANY WORDS!

October and November hold quite a few anniversaries for me: my birthday and The Kid’s birthday. Getting National Board Certified. Finishing chemo.

Today is none of those.

I made it a year! Every day, a post has gone live. Days I was sick. Days I was on vacation. Days that were just regular days. Sometimes written and scheduled ahead of time; sometimes written ahead of time but not scheduled and then oh crap I didn’t publish that post yet!; sometimes written, edited, and posted in short order.

Not all of them have been my best work, but I think that’s within the realm of reasonable.

It feels good to have made it this long. I recommend trying it. (If you do, let me know!)

Woot! Yay! Hooray!

Of course, once I hit “publish,” the last square on that year (in the photo) will fill in.

Getting followers was not my goal, but as you started to trickle in and accumulate, I started to notice. I was hoping to hit an even 100 followers by today and thought I had 97, but when I went into stats areas I don’t typically go (looking for something else), I noticed that email subscribers are counted separately. 100 followers!

Screen Shot 2019-10-31 at 3.35.27 PM

In chronological order, here are my posts from the last year with the most likes. (They’re set to open in new tabs.)

Update: accountability to self

It’s normal. But is it good?

Distracted exercising

Do something for you

Go get what you deserve

Junk on vacation: how I managed it

I like sweating

School, escapism, perfectionism

Standards and accountability and homework

Goal-setting, goal-pursuing, and real life

Making just a little time to let yourself feel better

Workplace wellness

The hidden side of … everyone

As I mentioned a couple of months ago, I’m going to cut down to three or four posts per week so I can dedicate more time to working on my book. I foresee returning to daily posting once that writing project is complete.

Thanks for reading, for liking, for commenting. I appreciate the interaction. I hope I’ve made a positive impact on your life in this journey.

 

 

Posted in about me, gifts, parenting, storytelling

Father’s Day gifts…belated

So … it’s not anywhere close to Father’s Day.

Here’s the story:

The Kid and I went to Burst of Butterflies, a local painting place (canvas, ceramic, etc.) where he painted two small identical tiles that said #1 Dad.

We were traveling for the actual holiday and picked up the tiles after we returned. We had talked about what we were going to do with them but didn’t do it.

And didn’t do it.

And forgot about it.

A week or two ago, I was cleaning out one (of too many) piles in the office and found the tiles.

Oops.

So I mentioned it to The Kid, and we decided to continue with the plan.

What was the plan again?

I’m not sure that what we settled on is exactly what we had decided originally, but what we made turned out well.

He chose a photo of himself with each daddy; I had them printed.

Using some craft foamy stuff, hot glue, and wide popsicle sticks, we made a picture frame for each photo (photo very much not removable), then added the tile to the top left corner, as per The Kid’s requirements.

We agreed that magnets would be the best way to make them hangable—they’re very imbalanced—but I don’t have any on hand. Those will need to be added later.

Overall, they turned out well, and we’re both happy with how they look. As for the daddies? They haven’t seen them yet, but moreso than in June, they’re sure going to be surprised!

Also, on a tangent: as we were getting all of the materials out and organized, The Kid said, “You know, Mom, we could make a video about making this and post it on YouTube. And then other kids could know how to make a great Father’s Day present.”

We could. But Mama is tired. And other minor resistances.

So when I sat down to write a blog post and was completely uninspired, I asked The Kid, “What should I write about?”

“Mom! You should write about making the Father’s Day presents! It’s a good story!”

And so it came to be.

By request:

The end.

Posted in connections, differences, mental health, mindset, socializing, storytelling, thoughtfulness, vulnerability

Statistics vs. actual people

Individual stories are where real emotional power lies.

I mean, that 3,000 people were killed is quite something.

That millions were killed in WWII is staggering.

They’re numbers. They’re big numbers. They’re easy to wield, hard to comprehend.

“A single death is a tragedy. A million deaths is a statistic.”

Stories? Those are where power lies. Not because it’s not sad to lose thousands of people at once, but because stories are where we connect.

That’s why there are transcriptions of last phone messages from 18 years ago.

That’s why a group (or more than one, possibly) is putting together the story of each individual person we lost in the terrorist attacks in 2001.

That’s why Anne Frank’s diary is so compelling.

That’s why we don’t interview people who are Other.

When we hear someone’s story and are open to it, we connect with our shared humanity. There are parts of their story that could be our story. It touches us. (Sometimes a story touches us despite our best efforts to stay closed. Those are the best.)

So … listen to people. Especially people who are different than you. Listen to their story. Connect with them. Share your humanity.